From LFG structures to dependency relations
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How to Cite

Meurer, Paul. 2017. “From LFG Structures to Dependency Relations”. Bergen Language and Linguistics Studies 8 (1). https://doi.org/10.15845/bells.v8i1.1341.

Abstract

In this article, I describe the derivation of dependency structures from LFG analyses, with a focus on the Norwegian grammar NorGram. Although it is the f-structures that at a first glance resemble dependency structures most, I show that c-structures are the correct starting point for the conversion, and I outline a conversion algorithm that relies on information from both c- and f-structure, the projection operator, and the grammar itself. The derived dependency structures are projective with non-atomic relations, but can be converted into nonprojective dependencies with atomic relations, and further into Universal Dependency-style structures. As an application, I describe how derived dependency versions of the NorGramBank gold-standard treebank are used to train dependency parsers with acceptable precision.

https://doi.org/10.15845/bells.v8i1.1341
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Copyright (c) 2017 Paul Meurer

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